Glastonbury – A tent is for life not just for a festival

So that’s it from Glastonbury for another year. With the controversy of Kanye West headlining Saturday night and stating that he is “the greatest living rock star on the planet”, to the debut of Lee-zus (aka Lee Nelson) gate crashing Kanye’s set and the roaring reception of Lionel Richie we can definitely say this one will be remembered for a while.

Glastonbury Festival, Britain - 27 Jun 2015  

With 177,550 attendees at Worthy Farm each year there will be a significant level of litter generated at the festival. So we decided to investigate HOW GREEN IS GLASTONBURY?

In 2014 the festival recycled; 114 tonnes of composted organise waste, 400 tonnes of chipped wood, 23 tonnes of glass, 85 tonnes of cans and plastic bottles, 41 tonnes of cardboard,11.2 tonnes of clothing, tents and sleeping bags. Overall 983 tonnes of waste was collected with 54% of it being recycled.

With the images of what has been left from Glastonbury this year is it possible they can do the same or even better than the previous year?

Glastonbury is trying to highlight the importance of recycling by promoting the phrases “Love the farm, leave no trace” as well as “Reduce, reuse and recycle”. Even with the introduction of these mottos it is still costing the festival around £780,000 to dispose of all the rubbish that is left at the festival. They have 15,000 bins and have 1,300 recycling crew volunteers as well as Small Steps Project who are a team of volunteers who do their bit to clean the site.

On a more cheerful note Glastonbury has managed to do things to improve and help the festival to become more environmentally sustainable. All of the tea, coffee, sugar and chocolate sold on site are all Fairtrade; they also run a Green Traveller Scheme to encourage travel by public transport, offering prizes and free food vouchers for those who participate. Reducing the Festival’s CO2 emissions is a top priority for the organisers of the festival.

Personal items such as tents and wellington boots are often left behind. Since 2011 Festival Reboot has worked with Glastonbury recycling any wellies that have been left, in their first year they collected 4000. Using the top half of the welly they are able to make and sell bracelets, drinks holders and notepads. From the money raised they then can send the lower section of the welly over to Kenya where they will be used for general footwear. They are also looking into making bean bag chairs filled with the off cuts of wellington boots which will result in nearly 100% recycling achievement. http://www.festivalreboot.co.uk/

If you are attending a festival this year and still haven’t bought a tent yet have a look at Green Tent Company; they are the first company in the world to design and manufacture tents that are solely made of polyester which means they can be recycled. They also offer a ‘Purchase and Collect’ service at festivals as well as a drop off point when you are finished. http://www.thegreententcompany.co.uk/

ReTent is another service which provides an incentive for campers for to repeatedly reuse their tents. The company believe that there is a lack of connection between festival-goers and their tent. To improve this ReTent will spray a stamp onto the tent to recognise that they have been to that festival; the more festivals people go to with the same tent the more stamps they will get. This will hopefully give people the motivation to reuse their tents as it will become memorabilia of their time at the festivals.  http://www.thegreententcompany.co.uk/

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Glastonbury has been a huge contributor to the local environment around the farm and charities. Since 2000, 10,000 native trees and hedge plants have been planted near to the site and £1 million has been donated to international and local charities each year. It is the single biggest donor to Greenpeace and also supports its official partners WaterAid and Oxfam.

Next up for us T in the Park 2015!

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